American politics is in the middle of a historic realignment.

Over the last decade, America’s working class, which was traditionally a mainstay of the Democratic Party’s base, has been gradually shifting to the Republican Party.

This was most evident in 2016 after President Donald Trump won Rust Belt states such as Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

With elections less than two months away, Trump is still very competitive in the aforementioned states, thus continuing the consolidation of this realignment.

This new electoral shift doesn’t stop there, however.

The latest development to confirm this trend is the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s decision to endorse several first-term House Democrats in their re-election bids. This decision sparked push-back from organizations on the right and was also met with resistance from the Chamber’s high-profile GOP donor base.

Politico explained the political implications of the Chamber’s decision:

The decision represents a sharp departure for the traditionally conservative Chamber, which has spent over $100 million backing Republican candidates during the past decade, and it threatens to further complicate the party’s prospects in the November election while driving a split in the business community.

Because of the Chamber’s change in political priorities, a number of donors and members are threatening to cut off funding from the organization.

A number of Chamber leaders such as State Chamber of Oklahoma President Chad Warmington wrote a letter on August 25, 2020 chastising the national Chamber leaders for their proposal to support Rep. Kendra Horn (D-Okla.).

Warmington alluded to the Oklahoma congresswoman’s dubious voting record on energy issues:

 I question how the U.S. Chamber could endorse a candidate who consistently voted against the largest industry in Oklahoma, employing over 90,000 workers throughout the state. That is hardly a pro-business record. I am also concerned the U.S. Chamber would endorse a congresswoman that voted in lockstep with Nancy Pelosi and other Democrats who are not pro-business nearly 90 percent of the time.

Warmington continued: “I don’t believe an endorsement of Congresswoman Horn is warranted at this time and certainly not justifiable based on the current record of consequential votes impacting Oklahoma businesses.”

Other Democrats such as Elaine Luria (D-VA.), Andy Kim (D-N.J.) and Joe Cunningham (D-S.C.) are expected to receive endorsements from the Chamber.

The newly emerging internal struggle within the Chamber is reflective of an ongoing trend taking place in the Trump-era GOP. Thanks to Trump’s election, concerns about “free” trade and mass migration have entered the center stage of political debate. Further, Trump’s nationalist economic and immigration policies have earned him the ire of the Chamber.

With the realignment taking place in the GOP, the Chamber now is attempting to play both sides of the political aisle and cast their lot with the more woke capitalist-centered Democrats.

Because of this shift in the Chamber’s alignment, GOP House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy accused the organization of selling out.  In an interview with Lou Dobbs, he declared:

Well, I will tell you this. I don’t want the U.S. Chamber’s endorsement, because they have sold out. You listen to your local chambers, those small businesses, when I used to own a business. You had Oklahoma, the city of Oklahoma, their endorsement. They wanted to endorse Stephanie Bice, not Kendra Horn that’s sitting and backing Pelosi or the Green New Deal or the others. I mean, it is just exactly what Nancy Pelosi did.

By giving the Chamber the cold shoulder, McCarthy is laying the groundwork for the GOP to look beyond the Conservatism Inc. bromides of yore and pursue a more nationalist agenda.

The fact remains that nationalism is probably America’s only hope in trying to bring some sense of stability to its politics. The unrelenting hordes of migrants that have made their way stateside since the Hart-Celler Act became law, is ripping America apart. If the GOP does not take this question seriously, the U.S. will be subject to unprecedented destabilization.

The good news is that the GOP is recognizing that the Chamber of Commerce — one of the biggest boosters of mass migration — is no longer a friend and has become beholden to the Woke Capital.

The quicker the GOP abandons Bush and Reagan era pro-business tropes, the better off it will be in expanding its base. Not only that, it will also be on pace to implement policies that actually benefit Americans and restore a middle class that has been decimated by misguided trade deals and mass migration.

Any conservative worth their salt should be socially distancing themselves from the Chamber of Commerce from now on. Their electoral relevance depends on it.